Wreckage of war

Sommer of 1941, somewhere in the western parts of the Soviet Union. In front of a knocked out Soviet BT-7 tank lie the cadaver of the horse that pulled the wrecked wagon and the body of the man who drove it. The German soldiers appear unaffected by the sight, but anyone reading memoirs by veterans from any country realize that death soon became so commonplace that it took much to make them react. Dead children, women and animals usually stirred up more emotions than yet another killed enemy. Even dead soldiers from their own side didn’t affect them much, unless the bodies showed signs of torture, execution, or if they had been mutilated. That often resulted in an unwillingness to take any prisoners. War has a brutalizing effect, and most soldiers could only deal with by becoming emotionally numb. Those who survived the war had often to face their demons as post-traumatic stress disorder caught up with them. Most never told their families what they had lived through, taking their bad memories with them to the grave.

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